Guest Blog by Andy Szpuk – “Poetry and Fate”

Poetry and Fate

by

Andy Szpuk

 

Photo0158 (2)My interest in poetry blossomed when I was working on a historical memoir of my father’s life, Sliding on the Snow Stone (That Right Publishing 2011). The story opens in Ukraine in 1932 and is one man’s journey through famine, Soviet terrors, Nazi occupation during World War Two and subsequent eviction from his beloved homeland. It’s one man’s quest to get back home, and for personal and cultural freedom.

I included, with permissions, English translations of some sections of ‘Kobzar’ by Taras Shevechenko, the most revered of Ukrainian poets, and each chapter of Sliding on the Snow Stone opens with a Ukrainian proverb. At that stage I resisted the notion of writing any of the memoir as poetry, although there is a short section in chapter one adapted from a poem of my father’s, and because of that, perhaps seeds were planted.

As a debut, Sliding on the Snow Stone proved to be a powerful and profound experience, and I knew finding a project to follow it wouldn’t be easy.

One day, almost by accident, a year or so after it was published, I constructed a short 12 line poem, called ‘History’, all about Sliding on the Snow Stone, and it served to act as a closure of sorts. A burden was somehow shifted, and I then knew it was time to move on.

Not that I’d wasted any time. Following the publication of Sliding on the Snow Stone I set up my blog, Lines from the Word Lab, to showcase my work and to engage with readers and the outside world. I also worked on a couple of side projects, while looking for another full-length work to undertake. And I wrote poems.

Then, one day, I discovered a story I knew was the one to tackle. My mother’s family comes from a region in the Carpathian Mountains called Lemkovyna, an area split across the borders of Ukraine, Poland and Slovakia. At the conclusion of World War Two, the Ukrainian Partisan Army remained active in battling for a free Ukraine, and regular ambushes took place on Polish or Soviet patrols. My mother’s people, the Lemkos, provided support to the partisans, whose activities continued into 1947, until an event occurred that was to trigger an act of revenge. A Polish General was murdered in an ambush by the partisans, and retribution arrived in the mountains. To break support to the partisans, the Polish Army came to carry out a forced resettlement.

The working title is ‘Fate and Circumstance’, and it already includes some poems, reflecting the thoughts of one of the characters, Kasper, who runs away to join the partisans.

My intention is to preface the novel with my own translation of one of Shevechenko’s works, a 16 line poem called ‘Fate’, from the abridged version of ‘Kobzar’. It was quite a challenge to translate even such a short piece, it took several attempts to get it into shape, and my appreciation of the talents of translators has grown as a result:

 _______________________________________________________________

 

FATE

Those poor, starving
wretches, my brothers and sisters,
All over Ukraine, eked out an existence,
Without mercy, you
crushed them under your boot,
But, as a young boy, you led me to school,
You guided me well, and
I quenched my thirst,
For knowledge and
learning, wisdom and verse.
‘One day, we’ll be
something, so learn well, my love’,
Your words drove me
on, they were enough,
To make sure I listened
and learned so much more,
But your words were
deception, for still I am poor.
My eyes on a road
that turned onto nowhere,
I followed you
blindly, I followed you square.
But my heart is still
open and so is my hand,
And we still walk
together all over this land.
We journey to glory, we
wander so far,
And my legacy rests in the depths of my heart.

______________________________________________________________________

 

This poem sees Shevchenko reflecting on the fortunate circumstances that enabled him to get an education, but his affinity with the common man is evident.

‘Fate and Circumstance’ is multi-themed, with three interwoven storylines. I hope to get it finished soon.

 

Read more of Andy’s work by following the below links.

LINKS: Andy Szpuk

http://www.amazon.com/Sliding-On-The-Snow-Stone/dp/1466305681/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1365580081&sr=8-1&keywords=szpuk     Reading Book HR (2)

http://andyszpuk.wordpress.com


1 Comment

  1. Very nice, Andy, very, very nice. I look forward to reading your new book when it comes out.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *